Adams now wished that America would be purified by its return to freedom and independence

Adams now wished that America would be purified by its return to freedom and independence

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Adams now wished that America would be purified by its return to freedom and  independence–that his Puritan ideals of a simple society would once again be made  true. Unfortunately, the days of post-revolutionary America were ones filled with  profiteers and speculators, hardly the saints, for whom Adams had hoped. Adams's  troubles were just beginning. His old friend John Hancock, who remained bitter that  Adams had not supported him for commander-in-chief of the American armies, had built  up a solid political base in Massachusetts while Adams worked at the Continental  Congress. In 1778, Adams received word that he had been reprimanded for his conduct  by the Boston town meeting–a personal blow to a man who had led the town meetings  for decades. And instead of electing a "pure" man to be the first governor of 
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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Adams now wished that America would be purified by its return to freedom and independence

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