Adams was so caught up in his political activities that he had allowed his father

Adams was so caught up in his political activities that he had allowed his father

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Unformatted text preview: Adams was so caught up in his political activities that he had allowed his father's estate to dwindle to nothing, and by 1760, he was nearly broke, surviving on his meager income as tax collector. His wife's death in 1757 had left him to raise his two kids alone, but nothing seemed to deter him from his rabble-rousing. His financial situation would change little for the rest of his life, and unlike the previous leader of the Country Party, who had a sizable fortune outside politics, Adams was so poor that during the revolution his friends had to pay his way to the Continental Congress in Philadelphia. The appointment of Thomas Pownall as governor in 1757 had gradually calmed Adams's heated rhetoric, as the new governor tried to appease the various factions in the colony. In fact, Pownall proved to be the most popular governor in almost sixty years. the colony....
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