Philip recognized that his victory over Athens did not give him license to rule tyrannically

Philip recognized that his victory over Athens did not give him license to rule tyrannically

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Philip recognized that his victory over Athens did not give him license to rule  tyrannically, as the situation remained precarious. He therefore offered terms so  generous that Athens accepted without argument or much time to reconsider. On the  other hand, the powers of Thebes had to be dismantled systematically. Its leaders had  already betrayed Macedonia once, so they could no longer be trusted. Moreover, as  Thebes did not have the fleet that made Athens more intimidating, Philip chose to act  severely while he could. With these powers defeated, Macedonia became the undisputed leader of the Greek  city-states. Philip used this influence to form the Hellenic League, which he designed  not only to maintain peace among the Greek states but to join him in the invasion of the  Persian empire. Only Sparta refused to participate. Not itself a league member, 
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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Philip recognized that his victory over Athens did not give him license to rule tyrannically

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