The appointment of Thomas Pownall as governor in 1757 had gradually calmed Adams

The appointment of Thomas Pownall as governor in 1757 had gradually calmed Adams

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The appointment of Thomas Pownall as governor in 1757 had gradually calmed  Adams's heated rhetoric, as the new governor tried to appease the various factions in  the colony. In fact, Pownall proved to be the most popular governor in almost sixty years.  The peace would not last, and in 1760 Pownall was replaced by Francis Bernard.  Decades later, the colonists remembered Pownall's reign as the "happiest times of their  life," and some promised to forego the Revolution if only the crown would restore the  liberties the colonists had had under Pownall. For his part, Bernard thought he had  found a perfect posting that would allow him to rest and live quietly–he saw  Massachusetts as one of the best behaved of the English colonies: it obeyed the trading  laws and kept a large standing army to help fight the French. Bernard could not have  been more wrong. Massachusetts was deeply chaotic politically, and the opposition 
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The appointment of Thomas Pownall as governor in 1757 had gradually calmed Adams

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