The Boston Massacre helped spur Bostonians and the surrounding countryside to action

The Boston Massacre helped spur Bostonians and the surrounding countryside to action

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The Boston Massacre helped spur Bostonians and the surrounding countryside to  action. Adams successfully argued that the New Englanders should be prepared to  resist the next incursion of British troops right from the start. Local militias began drilling  in open fields and preparing to do battle with the Redcoats, should they arrive again. In  Boston, the militia drilled nightly on Boston Common. Adams proclaimed, "Innocence is  no longer safe, we are now obliged to appeal to God and to our Arms for defense." Across the colonies, the Townshend Acts and the Boston Massacre had similar effects.  During the Stamp Act crisis, New York merchants had learned perhaps one of the most  effective ways to pressure the British government: they canceled outstanding orders  with British merchants and refused to purchase additional goods until the act was  repealed. When Adams remembered the New York ploy after the passage of the 
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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