The move from the Articles of Confederation to the Constitution

The move from the Articles of Confederation to the Constitution

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The move from the  Articles of Confederation  to the  Constitution , though, caused Adams  much concern. He fully believed that the United States were too large and had too many  different needs to be adequately represented under a single government. Adams also  wondered if the Constitution provided adequate protection for civil liberties, and his  belief in natural law–the very basis for all of his revolutionary work–made him wary of  any attempts to strengthen a central government. Adams remained silent on the issue  until after he was elected to the Constitutional Convention as a Massachusetts delegate.  The other delegates immediately recognized the danger Adams's opposition posed, and  they cultivated and organized a vote among Boston workingmen and artisans–Adams's  core supporters–to rebuke Adams for his anti-Constitution outbursts. They met in  January 1788 and voted to support the new document and the ensuing government. The 
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