The number of troops Alexander demanded from the League was relatively small

The number of troops Alexander demanded from the League was relatively small

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The number of troops Alexander demanded from the League was relatively small–the  mission was clearly his and not some kind of Greek crusade. It is likely that he may  have demanded these troops only as an attempt to ensure good behavior from the  individual city-states while he was away. Many states, especially Athens, were reluctant  to contribute. The largest component of the army consisted of mercenaries, who had  good reason to expect a lucrative invasion, the Macedonian debt notwithstanding.  Rounding out Alexander's troops were groups of archers and javelin throwers,  representing Crete and Thrace. The opposition they would face was a Persian army that drew on an imposing  population of approximately fifty million people. In reality, however, the Persian forces  were largely makeshift, poorly trained, and poorly equipped. Philip's death had made  them even more complacent and lax. Ironically, the most reliable infantry in Persian 
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