The Sugar Act underscored a growing disconnect between Britain and the colonies

The Sugar Act underscored a growing disconnect between Britain and the colonies

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The Sugar Act underscored a growing disconnect between Britain and the colonies. The  French and Indian War  had demonstrated that the colonies were unable to defend  themselves with British troops, and thus the war had cost the homeland dearly; on the  other hand, the influx of British troops and the need to provision and equip them had  helped boost the economy in the colonies. Thus, the British argued that the colonies  had gotten rich off the war while England shouldered the entire cost. Britain saw the  taxes as an attempt to even the playing field and cover the costs of defending the  colonies. The colonists saw things differently. With no voice in Parliament, many  colonists saw the taxes as a burden without giving them any real opinion in how to  spend it. The disconnect only worsened when, in 1764, Britain proposed the Stamp Act–which 
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