Also at the heart of the conflict were disagreements between powerful factions over the proper role

Also at the heart of the conflict were disagreements between powerful factions over the proper role

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Unformatted text preview: Also at the heart of the conflict were disagreements between powerful factions over the proper role the king should play in government. The Stuart family, which included Charles I, was inclined toward royal absolutism. This idea held that the king's power came from God, which meant the king was infallible and that no one else's views or needs could possibly be as important. Cromwell and most Parliamentarians, however, were inclined toward constitutionalism, a philosophy in which the king shares power with the nobility and the common people. When the English Civil War came to a conclusion, Cromwell was named Lord Protector, making him the most powerful man in England. The policies Cromwell pursued as Lord Protector set him apart from the Stuart rulers who came before and after him. He was militantly Protestant, to the point where conservatives in government began to see him...
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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