Aristotle - Aristotle's early works consisted largely of...

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Unformatted text preview: Aristotle's early works consisted largely of dialogues, many of which were lost. His model for these dialogues was, of course, Plato. At the height of Plato's productivity, Plato sought not to establish doctrines but rather to depict the philosopher in the dramatic process of discovery. Moreover, the process was not merely intellectual, for it took place in the context of politics, society, and personal struggle, over which philosophy had to emerge. Later in Plato's career, however, which is when Aristotle came to the Academy, Plato departed from this formula and placed less emphasis on aesthetic composition. His dialogues ceased to depict genuine intellectual struggle and instead consisted largely of prolonged exposition with occasional interjections of agreement. At least part of the reason for this change was that Plato's interests turned to more abstract studies, and he felt that more direct exposition would convey his ideas...
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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Aristotle - Aristotle's early works consisted largely of...

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