Aristotle goes on to discuss the concept of justice

Aristotle goes on to discuss the concept of justice -...

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Aristotle goes on to discuss the concept of justice, of which he recognized two forms:  first, the general sense of moral virtue and second, a particular instance of a virtue  being exercised. Particular justice is further divided into distributive and remedial: the  former is concerned with the distribution of resources in proportion to merit, while the  latter is concerned with the rectification of wrongs. Another central tension in the book is the issue of continence and incontinence–that is,  the strength or weakness of the will. While Socrates believed that all wrongdoing arose  from ignorance, Aristotle took the more intuitive view: that we recognize the right but  nevertheless fail to do it. To show how an incontinent person does know the good,  Aristotle allows that the person possesses the knowledge potentially but not actually. In  an incontinent person, desire prevents the potential knowledge from becoming 
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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Aristotle goes on to discuss the concept of justice -...

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