At St Ives - At St Ives, Cromwell's life was more that of a...

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Unformatted text preview: At St Ives, Cromwell's life was more that of a yeoman farmer than of a country gentleman. Cromwell's family had suffered a decline in social position when his rich, paternal uncle had lost his fortune at the end of the 1620s. It was not until 1636 that Cromwell would regain his status as a landowning gentleman. That year, an uncle on Cromwell's mother's side passed away and left all his property in Ely, also in East Anglia, to Cromwell. When the Cromwells moved to their new estate in Ely, Cromwell's mother and unmarried aunts joined them. At some point during the late 1620s or early 1630s, Cromwell experienced a momentous spiritual conversion. Previously, despite his Puritan upbringing, Cromwell had not been terribly fervent in his Christianity. A letter he wrote to a cousin in 1638, however, shows how profoundly his new religious convictions had overtaken him: "My soul is with the...
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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