Captivated by his brilliance and drawn to his personality

Captivated by his brilliance and drawn to his personality -...

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Captivated by his brilliance and drawn to his personality, Bohr soon decided to move to  Manchester, and Rutherford accepted him as a student. Although Rutherford was  fundamentally an experimental physicist and Bohr a theoretician, both developed great  mutual respect. When asked why he was able to make an exception for Bohr from his  general attitude toward theoreticians, Rutherford is said to have responded, "Bohr's  different. He's a football player!" Rutherford's aversion to theorizing, however, may have  held Bohr back. Based on experimental evidence that arose in Rutherford's lab, Bohr  began toying with the idea of isotopes (an atom of an element with the same atomic  number but a differing atomic mass) and radioactive displacement (the transformation of  an element to another element due to changes in atomic number). Rutherford was not  convinced and discouraged Bohr from advancing theories without the appropriate 
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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Captivated by his brilliance and drawn to his personality -...

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