For Aristotle

For Aristotle - For Aristotle, biology and psychology were...

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Unformatted text preview: For Aristotle, biology and psychology were intertwined, much more so than we would view them today, and he treated the two subjects as one science. The purpose of psychology was to discover the attributes and essence of the soul (translated from the Greek work psyche ). Aristotle struggled to come up with a single definition of the soul and concluded that none existed. On the other hand, the variations in the kinds of souls were not so different that some common ground could not be ascertained. Aristotle therefore arranged a series of various forms that become increasingly complex, so that each form of the soul possesses the qualities of all those that precede it in order. The most basic soul is nutritive, which exists in all living things, including both plants and animals. Beyond the nutritive soul is the sensitive soul, possessed by all animals. This animals....
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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For Aristotle - For Aristotle, biology and psychology were...

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