Forging a broad base of support for the new republican regime proved to be a difficult task for Crom

Forging a broad base of support for the new republican regime proved to be a difficult task for Crom

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Forging a broad base of support for the new republican regime proved to be a difficult  task for Cromwell, and the Rump Parliament was a chronic disappointment in this  regard. A powerful group of nobles known as the Independents refused to be publicly  associated with the idea of a republic–among them the important Parliamentarians  Wharton, Saye, and Sele. Like Cromwell, Saye, Wharton, and Sele thought that  England needed some form of monarchic power to remain strong. Parliament took an  important first step toward unified government on February twenty-four, 1652, when it  passed an Act of General Pardon and Oblivion that unilaterally forgave all of Charles I's  supporters and removed them from the threat of prosecution. Cromwell viewed such conciliatory policy as necessary, but in some ways the Rump  Parliament proved too conservative for Cromwell's tastes. He was particularly impatient 
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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