His central work in biological studies was titled The History of Animals

His central work in biological studies was titled The History of Animals

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His central work in biological studies was titled  The History of Animals.  Aristotle draws  the most important distinctions between animals with and without blood and between  viviparous (reproducing offspring within the female's body, as generally the case with  mammals) and oviparous (reproducing through the hatching of eggs) animals. He paid  considerable attention to the questions of reproduction and heredity, determining what  factors contribute in what ways. Aristotle's teleology played a particularly important role  in his biological studies. He believed that no organ was given to an animal without a  purpose. Thus he was careful to distinguish between final and variable characteristics.  Final characteristics were those essential to an animal species, while variable  characteristics consisted of qualities that develop rather than being naturally endowed. For Aristotle, biology and psychology were intertwined, much more so than we would 
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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His central work in biological studies was titled The History of Animals

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