Some of Aristotle

Some of Aristotle - Some of Aristotle's most celebrated...

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Unformatted text preview: Some of Aristotle's most celebrated work comes in the second book of Physics. He begins by attempting a definition of nature: natural objects possess an internal source of movement. The second chapter turns to physics (again, meaning natural philosophy) and mathematics, which Platonists had previously distinguished as studies of different objects. Aristotle argued that the two subjects studied the same objects in different ways. In other words, the objects studied in physics consist of the very properties planes and solids, for examplewith which mathematics deals. Thus mathematics abstracts from the limits of physical bodies so that the properties are investigated without regard to motion. The most famous part of Physics is Aristotle's theory of the Four Causes. In this task he is searching for the kinds of causes that a natural philosopher must study: 1) the...
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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Some of Aristotle - Some of Aristotle's most celebrated...

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