The most famous part of Physics is Aristotle

The most famous part of Physics is Aristotle - The most...

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Unformatted text preview: The most famous part of Physics is Aristotle's theory of the Four Causes. In this task he is searching for the kinds of causes that a natural philosopher must study: 1) the element or material from which a thing comes into being (e.g., the bronze of a statue); 2) the form or blueprint (e.g., the ratio 2:1 provides the formula for an octave); 3) the immediate origin of motion or rest (e.g., the father is the origin of the child); and 4) the end or objective (e.g., health is the cause of exercise). Aristotle goes on to distinguish between accidental and essential factors. A sculptor is an essential cause of a statue, but "a white male" would be true only incidentally. Books 3 through 7 deal generally with motion and the process of change. By the eighth book he is prepared to make some loftier conclusions. He postulates the existence of a book he is prepared to make some loftier conclusions....
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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