The Politics is broken into three sections

The Politics is broken into three sections -...

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The Politics is broken into three sections: the first three books offer an introduction to  political science, the next three discuss practical politics, and the last two consider the  ideal state. The work as a whole has been criticized for being disorganized and  disjointed, but other scholars have questioned whether the traditional ordering of the  books is how Aristotle would have intended it (since it is based loosely on a lecture  series). Aristotle begins with a discussion of the city-state. He prefers this smaller unit to a  national state because his ideal government must allow all citizens to meet in a single  assembly. The most basic unit is actually the family, and households join together to  form villages. Villages join together to form a city-state, which is the ultimate form of  association because it can be self-sufficient. The development of the city-state is 
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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The Politics is broken into three sections -...

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