The problem still remained that more energy was required to cause the split than could be produced b

The problem still remained that more energy was required to cause the split than could be produced b

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Unformatted text preview: The problem still remained that more energy was required to cause the split than could be produced by it. But further experiments by Bohr, Fermi, and others revealed the possibility that a chain reaction could be set off by the neutrons released in fission. The March day in 1939 when Fermi sent his findings to be published, he also met with the chief of naval operations to inform him of the significance his results could have in the creation of an explosive of unprecedented power. Meanwhile, Fermi's partner in the experiment, Leo Szilard, met with Bohr and others and discussed the implications of their work. No one present at the meeting doubted that the scientists remaining in Germany were capable of reaching similar results, if they hadn't already. Szilard thus urged that the work be pushed forward with urgency, and also that this work be...
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The problem still remained that more energy was required to cause the split than could be produced b

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