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SL+D103+lecture+5 - D103: Cell Biology Dr. Shin Lin Lecture...

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D103: Cell Biology Dr. Shin Lin
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D103 Fall 2011 Lecture 5 © Lin All rights reserved Lecture 5 The Cytoskeleton I: General Principles, Actin Filament Organization Recommended Reading: MBOC, 5th edition, p.965-1010 2
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D103 Fall 2011 Lecture 5 © Lin All rights reserved 3 The Cytoskeleton: General Principles Introduction Building blocks of the cytoskeleton Properties of cytoskeletal elements
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D103 Fall 2011 Lecture 5 © Lin All rights reserved 4 Do cells have a skeleton? YES!
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iClicker: Is the function of the cytoskeleton just like that of the skeleton in our body? • A. Yes. That is why it is called the “cytoskeleton”. • B. No. The name “cytoskeleton” is a misnomer considering how different it is from the skeleton. D103 Fall 2011 Lecture 5 © Lin All rights reserved 5
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D103 Fall 2011 Lecture 5 © Lin All rights reserved 6 That’s where the analogy ends. • Cytoskeleton = cytoskeleton + cytomusculature, providing structure as well as creating movement. • Unlike the bones in the body, the cytoskeleton goes through cycles of assembly and disassembly, with building blocks used for diverse structures/functions according to needs.
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D103 Fall 2011 Lecture 5 © Lin All rights reserved 7 Cells need a (cyto)skeleton to: • create shape • change shape • allow movement - of the cell - within the cell
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D103 Fall 2011 Lecture 5 © Lin All rights reserved 8 Microtubules Three Types of Cytoskeletal Networks Functional Similarities/Differences Actin filaments – cell shape, cell locomotion Intermediate filaments – mechanical strength Microtubules – organelle positioning, intracellular transport This 3T3 (mouse fibroblast ) cell was triple stained: with Alexa Fluor 488 conjugated phalloidin for actin filaments (green) , anti-tubulin followed by Cy3 conjugated secondary antibody for microtubules (red) , and DAPI for DNA (blue) This PtK2 (epithelial ) cells were stained for mitochondria network with MitoTracker CMXRos (Red), anti-cytokeratin followed by fluorescein conjugated secondary antibody for intermediate filaments (green) , and DAPI for DNA (blue)
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D103 Fall 2011 Lecture 5 © Lin All rights reserved 9 Microtubules (MT): hollow tubes made of tubulin • rigid, long, straight Actin microfilaments (MF): helical polymers made of actin
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SL+D103+lecture+5 - D103: Cell Biology Dr. Shin Lin Lecture...

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