Lecture 22

Lecture 22 - CHM 115 Lecture 22 Todays Lecture Reading was...

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1 CHM 115 Lecture 22 Today’s Lecture Reading was KTT: Special Readings Drugs and Drug Development Curing Disease Forward Chemical Genetics Reverse Chemical Genetics Designing Drugs Lipinski’s Rules Polymorphism Next Lecture Review the Readings found on Blackboard
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2 Study Session If you think I can be of help in preparing for the next exam: Study/Help Session Tuesday, 17 November 7:00 to 9:00 PM Room 172, Pharmacy Building
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3 Homework due Midnight, Wednesday, 18 November Exam is on Thursday, 19 November, at 6:30 PM Covers Lectures 15 thru 23 Elliott Hall of Music (Same drill as before!)
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Laboratory this Week Prepare! Read the lab manual, chapter 10 GO TO Recitation for sure 4
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5 Malaria Malaria is caused by parasitic protozoa (genus: Plasmodium) and is transferred to humans by mosquitoes Symptoms: VERY high fever (107°F), nausea, delirium There are an estimated 100 – 200 MILLION cases of malaria worldwide each year (80% are in Africa) 1 – 1.5 millions deaths per year
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6 Malaria Parasites reproduce in the liver then in red blood cells Parasites
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7 Treatment of Malaria: Quinine Before the arrival of European settlers, Peruvian Indians used bark from the Cinchona tree (found in the Andes) to treat fever; it also was found to cure malaria. Europeans learned about the healing ability of Cinchona bark and started harvesting it (almost to extinction, but for the development of conservation efforts) and sending it back to Europe.
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8 Treatment of Malaria: Quinine The active ingredient in the Cinchona bark is quinine, isolated in 1820. Quinine cures malaria by killing the parasite (it binds to proteins in the body that the parasites need).
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9 Many drugs are discovered in the same way as quinine: Forward Chemical Genetics Aspirin – salicylic acid (not aspirin) was obtained by chewing on Willow bark or brewing bark tea. Alfred Bayer in Germany discovered that the acetyl ester was more effective for pain relief, and called it “aspirin” (the trademark was lost when the US seized all domestic German assets after WW I).
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Forward Chemical Genetics Countless potential  drugs are isolated from plants,  algae, and even things like sea sponges. Mold in a Petri dish led to the discovery of penicillin.
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Lecture 22 - CHM 115 Lecture 22 Todays Lecture Reading was...

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