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Monitors - CPE 619 Monitors Aleksandar Milenkovi The LaCASA...

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CPE 619 Monitors Aleksandar Milenković The LaCASA Laboratory Electrical and Computer Engineering Department The University of Alabama in Huntsville http://www.ece.uah.edu/~milenka http://www.ece.uah.edu/~lacasa
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2 Part II: Measurement Techniques and Tools Measurements are not to provide numbers but insight - Ingrid Bucher Measure computer system performance Monitor the system that is being subjected to a particular workload How to select appropriate workload In general performance analysis should know 1. What are the different types of workloads? 2. Which workloads are commonly used by other analysts? 3. How are the appropriate workload types selected? 4. How is the measured workload data summarized? 5. How is the system performance monitored ? 6. How can the desired workload be placed on the system in a controlled manner? 7. How are the results of the evaluation presented?
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3 Outline Introduction Terminology Software Monitors Hardware Monitors Monitoring Distributed Systems
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4 Monitors A monitor is a tool used to observe activities on a system Observe performance Collect performance statistics May analyze the data May display results May even suggest remedies Monitors are used not only by performance analysts Systems programmer may profile software System manager may measure resource utilization to find bottleneck System manager may use to tune system System analyst may use to characterize workload System analyst may use to develop models or inputs for models That which is monitored improves. – Source unknown
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5 Outline Introduction Terminology Software Monitors Hardware Monitors Monitoring Distributed Systems
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6 Terminology Event – a change in the system state E.g.: cache miss, page fault, process context switch, beginning of seek on a disk, arrival of a packet, Trace – a log of events, usually including the time of the event, and other important parameters Overhead – most monitors perturb the system operation Use CPU or storage; Sometimes called artifact. Goal is to minimize artifact Domain – the set of activities observable by the monitor E.g.: accounting logs record information about CPU time, number of disks, terminals, networks, paging I/O’s, the number of characters transferred among disks, terminals, networks, and paging devices
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7 Terminology (cont’d) Input rate – the maximum frequency of events that monitor can correctly observe Burst mode: the rate at which an event can occur for a short period of time Sustained mode: the rate the monitor can tolerate for long durations Resolution – coarseness of the information observed Input width – the number of bits recorded for each event. Input rate x width = storage required
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8 Monitor Classification Implementation level Software, Hardware, Firmware, Hybrid Trigger mechanism Event driven – activated only by occurrence of certain events; Low overhead for rare event,
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