Workloads - CPE 619 Workloads Types Selection...

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CPE 619 Workloads: Types, Selection, Characterization Aleksandar Milenković The LaCASA Laboratory Electrical and Computer Engineering Department The University of Alabama in Huntsville http://www.ece.uah.edu/~milenka http://www.ece.uah.edu/~lacasa
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2 Part II: Measurement Techniques and Tools Measurements are not to provide numbers but insight - Ingrid Bucher Measure computer system performance Monitor the system that is being subjected to a particular workload How to select appropriate workload In general performance analysis should know 1. What are the different types of workloads? 2. Which workloads are commonly used by other analysts? 3. How are the appropriate workload types selected? 4. How is the measured workload data summarized? 5. How is the system performance monitored? 6. How can the desired workload be placed on the system in a controlled manner? 7. How are the results of the evaluation presented?
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3 Types of Workloads Test workload – denotes any workload used in performance study Real workload – one observed on a system while being used Cannot be repeated (easily) May not even exist (proposed system) Synthetic workload – similar characteristics to real workload Can be applied in a repeated manner Relatively easy to port; Relatively easy to modify without affecting operation No large real-world data files; No sensitive data May have built-in measurement capabilities Benchmark == Workload Benchmarking is process of comparing 2+ systems with workloads benchmark v. trans. To subject (a system) to a series of tests In order to obtain prearranged results not available on Competitive systems. S. Kelly-Bootle, The Devil’s DP Dictionary
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4 Test Workloads for Computer Systems Addition instructions Instruction mixes Kernels Synthetic programs Application benchmarks
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5 Addition Instructions Early computers had CPU as most expensive component System performance == Processor Performance CPUs supported few operations; the most frequent one was addition Computer with faster addition instruction performed better Run many addition operations as test workload Problem More operations, not only addition Some more complicated than others
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6 Instruction Mixes Number and complexity of instructions increased Additions were no longer sufficient Could measure instructions individually, but they are used in different amounts => Measure relative frequencies of various instructions on real systems Use as weighting factors to get average instruction time Instruction mix – specification of various instructions coupled with their usage frequency Use average instruction time to compare different processors Often use inverse of average instruction time MIPS – Million Instructions Per Second FLOPS – Millions of Floating-Point Operations Per Second Gibson mix: Developed by Jack C. Gibson in 1959 for IBM 704 systems
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Workloads - CPE 619 Workloads Types Selection...

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