The value of money is ultimately determined by the intersection of the money supply

The value of money is ultimately determined by the intersection of the money supply

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The value of money is ultimately determined by the intersection of the money supply, as  controlled by the Fed, and money demand, as created by consumers. Figure 1 depicts  the money market in a sample economy. The money supply curve is vertical because  the Fed sets the amount of money available without consideration for the value of  money. The money demand curve slopes downward because as the value of money  decreases, consumers are forced to carry more money to make purchases because  goods and services cost more money. Similarly, when the value of money is high,  consumers demand little money because goods and services can be purchased for low  prices. The intersection of the money supply curve and the money demand curve shows  both the equilibrium value of money as well as the equilibrium price level.  The value of money, as revealed by the money market, is variable. A change in money 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
Ask a homework question - tutors are online