{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Economists graphically represent the relationship between product price and quantity demanded with a

Economists graphically represent the relationship between product price and quantity demanded with a

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Economists graphically represent the relationship between product price and quantity  demanded with a demand curve. Typically, demand curves are downwards sloping,  because as price increases, buyers are less likely to be willing or able to purchase  whatever is being sold. Each individual buyer can have their own demand curve,  showing how many products they are willing to purchase at any given price, as shown  below. This graph shows what Jim's demand curve for graham crackers might be:  To find out how many boxes of graham crackers Jim will buy for a given price, extend a  perpendicular line from the price on the y-axis to his demand curve. At the point of  intersection, extend a line from the demand curve to the x-axis (perpendicular to the x- axis). Where it intersects the x-axis (quantity) is how many boxes of graham crackers  Jim will buy. For instance, in the graph above, Jim will buy 3 boxes when the price is $2 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}