A number of other competitors filed suit against Edison between 1885

A number of other competitors filed suit against Edison between 1885

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
A number of other competitors filed suit against Edison between 1885–1900 after the  U.S. patent commissioner ruled that another inventor had established precedence to an  electrical lamp with carbonized paper. The Edison group spent almost $2 million  defending itself in court. The protracted legal battles drained the company of capital and  kept its focus off of inventing for half a decade. The most important battle began in 1885, when Edison's group filed suit against the  United States Electric Company and George Westinghouse, for infringement of the  carbon-filament patent. After complex and difficult legislation, the courts eventually  upheld Edison's patent in 1891 and again in 1892. Instead of giving up, Westinghouse  quickly set about battling Edison in a more effective way: in the marketplace. Westinghouse was a self-taught electrician and inventor whose primary inventions lay in 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/13/2011 for the course ART 2313 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '10 term at Texas State.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online