Although entering the Church had been a vague possibility before the Beagle

Although entering the Church had been a vague possibility before the Beagle

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Although entering the Church had been a vague possibility before the  Beagle,  it was  now out of the question. Charles began to look for a way to set himself up as a  gentleman-naturalist. He also started looking for a wife. After some debate, recorded in  his notes, he decided that marriage would suit him better than bachelorhood. He chose  his cousin, Emma Wedgwood, whom he had seen for so many years on his hunting trips  to Maer, proposing to her in November 1838. Emma happily accepted and they were  married a few months later, in January 1839. Their first house was nothing spectacular:  a small place on Gower St. in Bloomsbury. It was close to the scientific community but  also, unfortunately, to the dirt and noise of industrial London. It was at about this time that Charles's health started to fail. Soon after the birth of his  first son, William, in December of 1939, Darwin found himself becoming nauseous and 
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