Darwin did not spend eight years on a single species

Darwin did not spend eight years on a single species -...

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Darwin did not spend eight years on a single species. As soon as he started studying  one species, he realized that he would have difficulty describing its unique features  unless he had some sense of what the whole family of barnacles was like. So he started  requesting to borrow the samples of other species. What started as a trickle soon turned  into a flood, and Darwin found himself inundated with offers of specimens from  conchologists and private collectors. He realized that there was no definitive work on  barnacles; in fact, the whole field of barnacle classification was a mess. Darwin decided  that he could be the one to clean up that mess, so he dived headfirst into a full-scale  study of barnacles, including not only current species but also those that had been  discovered in fossil beds. Darwin's friendship with Hooker grew. Hooker became Darwin's main resource 
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Darwin did not spend eight years on a single species -...

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