Emily Dickinson was growing into an interesting woman

Emily Dickinson was growing into an interesting woman -...

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Unformatted text preview: Emily Dickinson was growing into an interesting woman. She mentioned in letters to her old Amherst Academy school friends that she was disappointed in her stick-straight figure, but she did have beautiful auburn curls, translucent skin, and large brown eyes. In 1848, the daguerreotype craze was in full swing–photography was a new and exciting invention–and Dickinson had her photograph taken. The likeness she saw disappointed her deeply. This photograph is one of the only ones of Dickinson in existence. Because of her posthumous fame, the photograph is one of the most famous of an American author. At school, Dickinson was coming into her own. She enjoyed her studies and excelled at them. Although she still missed her family terribly, she had adjusted well to life away from home. Mount Holyoke's headmistress, Mary Lyon, felt religion was an important from home....
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This note was uploaded on 12/13/2011 for the course ART 2313 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '10 term at Texas State.

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