Patent battles and competition with George Westinghouse temporarily slowed Edison

Patent battles and competition with George Westinghouse temporarily slowed Edison

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Patent battles and competition with George Westinghouse temporarily slowed Edison's  research on electrical light systems, but competition spurred his research on the  phonograph. Because it had yet to provide much income and was still widely considered  to be a toy, Edison had let the phonograph languish. But Alexander Graham Bell,  distraught that he had not invented one first, saw great market potential in the device. In  1885 he and two of his colleagues applied for a patent on their invention, the  "graphophone." The graphophone depended heavily upon Edison's phonograph  technology. Bell then approached Edison with a proposition to jointly market an improved  phonograph. Edison, furious, set his energy to improving the phonograph. He produced  several new models in the early 1890s and searched for a dependable power source  that would make the device useful for the home market. He found the perfect match of 
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