The altarpiece for the friars was to be a painting of the Virgin and Saint Anne

The altarpiece for the friars was to be a painting of the Virgin and Saint Anne

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The altarpiece for the friars was to be a painting of the Virgin and Saint Anne, following  the then current vogue for St. Anne, Mary's mother; at the time there was much  discussion of an apocryphal passage which claimed that St. Anne was also a virgin  mother. By 1501, Leonardo had begun work on the cartoon, or preliminary drawing. The  painting itself was never finished, although he worked on it from time to time over the  years. This painting is perhaps more beautiful incomplete than it would be complete.  The Virgin, bending down, sits with her mother St. Anne. Anne's face is dark and  mysterious, as if she is going to tell the fate of Jesus, while Mary remains warm and  content. Mary seems anxious to keep the Child with her, although the child seems to be  already interested in tending "his flock." In 1502, Leonardo finally got his chance to act as a military engineer. In 1502, Cesare 
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This note was uploaded on 12/13/2011 for the course ART 2313 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '10 term at Texas State.

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The altarpiece for the friars was to be a painting of the Virgin and Saint Anne

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