The American literary world was not closed to female writers

The American literary world was not closed to female...

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The American literary world was not closed to female writers, but it did not welcome  them, either. Harriet Beecher Stowe was the notable exception to the unspoken rules  barring women from the literary club. In 1852, Stowe published the immensely popular,  controversial novel  Uncle Tom's Cabin.  Despite the gains made in fiction by women like  Stowe, poetry was still considered a man's arena, especially in New England, where  heavyweights like Ralph Waldo Emerson and Walt Whitman practiced their art. Dickinson's father was liberal in some respects and conservative in others. He would  have disapproved if he knew Dickinson spent her time writing in her room, so she kept  her massive collection of writings locked in a secret drawer in her room. Dickinson's only  publicly disseminated poems were those she sent to friends and family as notes,  birthday greetings, and Valentines. In her lifetime, Dickinson published only seven poem 
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The American literary world was not closed to female...

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