The rise of evolutionist thinking made the idea of a chain of being fall out of favor

The rise of evolutionist thinking made the idea of a chain of being fall out of favor

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The rise of evolutionist thinking made the idea of a chain of being fall out of favor. By the  19th century, it was increasingly obvious from archaeological research that some  species could become extinct and others could arise, apparently spontaneously.  Conservative thinkers argued that these extinctions and creations were the work of an  active God. However, others argued that there were natural, non-religious explanations  for the extinction and creation of species. Darwin's own grandfather, Erasmus Darwin,  proposed many of the ideas about evolution for which Charles would later find evidence.  In his  Zoonomia,  published in two volumes in 1794 and 1796, he described the varieties  of life in the world and suggested that new species arose from the modification of old  ones. Although Charles claimed to have gotten little from  Zoonomia,  it is obvious that he 
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This note was uploaded on 12/13/2011 for the course ART 2313 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '10 term at Texas State.

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The rise of evolutionist thinking made the idea of a chain of being fall out of favor

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