Though Edison drifted in and out of formal school environments

Though Edison drifted in and out of formal school environments

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Though Edison drifted in and out of formal school environments, he was largely taught  by his mother and himself. At the age of twelve his schooling ended when he took a job  as a "candy butcher" on the Grand Trunk Railroad, selling newspapers, magazine, and  snacks to passengers. The railroad job granted him access to new cities like Detroit and  allowed him to showcase his budding entrepreneurial skills. He set up a printing press  and a chemistry lab in the baggage car. On days when important battles of the  Civil War   broke out, he made a great deal of money by baiting the crowds with snippets of  information about the battle that he had arranged to be telegraphed ahead of time, then  selling his papers at inflated prices. Edison came from a family of political activists: his great-grandfather, John, fought for  the British during the Revolutionary War and was nearly executed for treason. His own 
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This note was uploaded on 12/13/2011 for the course ART 2313 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '10 term at Texas State.

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Though Edison drifted in and out of formal school environments

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