To shore up his understanding of variation under artificial selection

To shore up his understanding of variation under artificial selection

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To shore up his understanding of variation under artificial selection–the kind of selection  that had produced pets and domestic farm animals–Darwin started to learn all he could  about pigeons. Breeding pigeons was a pastime that few aristocrats threw themselves  into, but Darwin eagerly built a shed in the yard behind Down House. He started making  trips into London to speak to the professionals, downing beers with them while they  boasted about how they could see differences of 1/16th of an inch between two pigeon's  beaks. Darwin studied not only living, breeding pigeons, but also dead ones; for a while,  his workshop became a shop of horrors as he killed and 'skeletonized' pigeons of all  varieties and ages, not to mention the occasional rabbit or chicken, studying the  sometimes striking differences in structure between different varieties. Meanwhile, Darwin was testing out his theory of evolution on friends like Hooker and 
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This note was uploaded on 12/13/2011 for the course ART 2313 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '10 term at Texas State.

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