Lab 02 OS Fundamentals Pre_final

Lab 02 OS Fundamentals Pre_final - OSFundamentals PreLab

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Information Technology Experiential Learning Lab (ITELL) ©Copyright 2010 School of Information Studies Syracuse University Last Updated on 8/8/2011 Used in course IST 346 OS Fundamentals Pre Lab
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OS Fundamentals Pre Lab Page 2 L02 OS F UNDAMENTALS O VERVIEW This lab will demonstrate some key commonalities and differences between the Windows and Linux operating systems. L EARNING O BJECTIVES Upon completion of this lab, you should be able to: Understand commonalities among Operating Systems Understand how the Windows and Linux operating systems handle configuration data internally. Understand how to view and/or configure settings using different UIs Understand the steps required to patch and update these operating systems. L AB B REAKDOWN This lab consists of 4 parts: Interfaces User Security Models Learn to patch and update Operating Systems On Your Own There is a good amount of work that may need to be completed outside of class time! R EQUIREMENTS Before you start this lab you will need: The same requirements as previous labs. Completion of all previous labs; including post lab instructions.
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OS Fundamentals Pre Lab Page 3 I NSTALLATION O PTIONS In lab 01 we installed two operating systems using the most common method, manually from CD/DVD. All other operating systems, including Windows 7 and Macintosh, allow for this method. As you saw it is the method that allows you to control the installation configuration by manually setting each option throughout the process. However, all OSes also allow for automated installations using various methods. While manual installations are the easiest to perform, they are not the best method to use in a business setting. Manual installations rely too much upon people to remember to perform the exactly same steps every time; you can image what happens when a person is doing an install and is interrupted, right? Installations used in business need to be as consistent as possible to simplify support and to minimize security worries. The automated approach allows the administrator to preconfigure settings and installation options. We’ll learn more about this later in the semester. C ONFIGURATION M ANAGEMENT This section will introduce and demonstrate how the Windows and Linux operating systems deal with configuration data internals. All computer operating systems need configuration data. Operating systems contain a lot of files to support the kernel, device drivers, command shells, GUI shells and various utilities. For each of these items there are settings. These settings tweak the behavior of the operating system components. Where are those settings stored and how can they be administered on a larger scale? These settings (from the system side of things, anyway) is the underlying theme of this section. Example: Both Windows and Linux let you change how the mouse behaves.
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This note was uploaded on 12/13/2011 for the course IST 346 taught by Professor Rieks during the Fall '11 term at Syracuse.

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Lab 02 OS Fundamentals Pre_final - OSFundamentals PreLab

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