1.+Introduction+to+the+Problems+of+Parasites

1.+Introduction+to+the+Problems+of+Parasites -...

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Syllabus is posted on the class website (EEE)
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Weekly quiz component (EEE)   20% of grade Midterm exam (Thursday April 29, 2010)   40% of grade Final exam (Tuesday June 8, 2010, 4-6 PM)   40% of grade Professor Naomi Morrissette 3213 McGaugh Hall [email protected] office hours: Thursday 2-3 PM or by appointment Professor Anthony James Vector Biology Lectures Teaching Assistants: Heidi Contreras ([email protected]) Seong Kim ([email protected]) office hours: Friday 11:00-12:00 BC’s cavern (or by appointment)
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Lunch • Drawing of student name at the beginning of each  class. • If you aren’t in class, you forfeit chance… • Students in groups of 4 • BC’s (sorry)
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Lecture 1  Introduction to the Problems of  Parasites So, Nat’ralist observe, a Flea Hath smaller Fleas that on him prey, & those have smaller fleas to bite ‘em; Johnathan Swift,  On Poetry: A Rhapsody (1733)
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par∙a∙site ( păr ' -sīt') ə        n.   1.Biology. sheltered on or in a different organism while  contributing nothing to the survival of its  host.  2a. One who habitually takes advantage of the  generosity of others without making any  useful return.  2b. One who lives off & flatters the rich; a  sycophant. 3.A professional dinner guest, especially in  ancient Greece. [Latin parasītus, a person who lives by  amusing the rich, from Greek parasītos,  person who eats at someone else's table,  parasite : para-, beside; sītos, grain, food.]
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Parasites are eukaryotic organisms within:  protozoan (unicellular) group helminth (multicellular “worm”) group humans represent a highly successful system of essential  able to take advantage of these niches Multicellular worms Unicellular protozoa
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Viruses : require host cell machinery to replicate. Bacteria : prokaryotic, can be free living, some are obligate or obligate  intracellular pathogens.  Fungi : eukaryotic pathogens, typically extracellular, cell wall can be  targeted by drugs. Protozoan Parasites : unicellular eukaryotes, some are free- living in the environment, others only live in hosts, some of  these must live inside host cells while others are extracellular. Helminth Parasites : multicellular “worms” -- some are free- living in the environment, others only live in hosts, some of  these must live inside host cells while others are extracellular. Although all infectious disease pathogens can be 
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This note was uploaded on 12/13/2011 for the course BIOSCI m143 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at UC Irvine.

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1.+Introduction+to+the+Problems+of+Parasites -...

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