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Ch03_Test_File - Chapter 3 Macromolecules and the Origin of...

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Chapter 3: Macromolecules and the Origin of Life TEST FILE QUESTIONS Multiple Choice 1. Large molecules that contain carbon and are held together by covalent bonds are called a. proteins. b. polymers. c. nucleic acids. d. macromolecules. e. monomers. Textbook Reference: 3.0 How Sweet It Is, p. 38 2. Which of the following is not a macromolecule? 3. The bonds that form between the units of polymeric macromolecules are _______ bonds. 4. Which of the following pairs is not a correct monomer/polymer pairing? a. Monosaccharide/polysaccharide b. Amino acid/protein c. Triglyceride/cellulose d. Nucleotide/DNA e. Nucleotide/RNA Textbook Reference: 3.1 What Kinds of Molecules Characterize Living Things? p. 40 5. In condensation reactions, the atoms that make up a water molecule are derived from a. oxygen. b. only one of the reactants.
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c. both of the reactants. d. carbohydrates. e. enzymes. Textbook Reference: 3.1 What Kinds of Molecules Characterize Living Things? p. 41 6. Polymerization reactions in which polysaccharides are synthesized from monosaccharides a. require the formation of phosphodiester bonds between the amino acids. b. occur in the nucleus of the cell. c. are hydrolysis reactions. d. depend upon van der Waals forces to hold the amino acids together. e. result in the formation of water. Textbook Reference: 3.1 What Kinds of Molecules Characterize Living Things? p. 41 7. During the formation of a peptide linkage, a(n) _______ is formed. a. molecule of water b. disulfide bridge c. hydrophobic bond d. hydrophilic bond e. ionic bond Textbook Reference: 3.1 What Kinds of Molecules Characterize Living Things? p. 41 8. Polysaccharides, polypeptides, and polynucleotides a. contain simple sugars. b. are broken down in hydrolysis reactions. c. are found in cell membranes. d. contain nitrogen. e. have molecular weights less than 30,000 daltons. Textbook Reference: 3.1 What Kinds of Molecules Characterize Living Things? p. 41 9. Amino acids can be classified by the a. number of monosaccharides they contain. b. number of carbon–carbon double bonds in their fatty acids. c. number of peptide bonds they can form. d. number of disulfide bridges they can form. e. characteristics of their side chains or “R” groups. Textbook Reference: 3.2 What Are the Chemical Structures and Functions of Proteins? p. 42 10. A protein can best be defined as a polymer a. of amino acids. b. containing one or more polypeptide chains.
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c. containing 20 amino acids. d. containing 20 peptide linkages. e. containing double helices. Textbook Reference: 3.2 What Are the Chemical Structures and Functions of Proteins? p. 42 11. Which of the following is characteristic of proteins?
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