Phonetics VII - Phonetics VII October 5, 2011 Today...

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Phonetics VII October 5, 2011
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Today Phonetic Processes
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Recap Last class, we… Talked about phonetic transcription Narrow vs. broad Importance of the utterance
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Phonetic Processes Speech is continuous (and very fast!) We don’t have “spaces” between each of our speech sounds Compare: continuous “speech” [spi ʧ ] vs. individually articulated “speech” [s] [p] [i] [ ʧ ]
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Phonetic Processes We start preparing for one sound before finishing the last The articulators are moved into position fluidly The articulation of one sound can affect the articulation of another.
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Phonetic Processes Coarticulation: One sound influencing the articulation of the other in a sequence of phonetic segments; more than one articulator is active E.g., [pl]: while making the [p], and before the lips separate, the tongue will start to move to the alveolar ridge (to make the [l]) Consequence of the complex motions necessary for speech
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Phonetic Processes Phonetic process : Adjustments in articulation that occur during the production of connected speech The way we say a sound in a word can be different from the way we say the same sound by itself Can make words easier to say ( more efficient articulation ) or perceive ( more distinct output )
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Phonetic Processes Easier to say (articulate): e.g., nasalizing vowels before nasal sounds in English Easier to hear (perceive): e.g., lengthening segments “Did you say the colour was Fred!?!” “No, I said rrrrrrrrred!”
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Assimilation One sound becomes more like another Textbook: “The influence of one segment on another, resulting in a sound becoming more like a nearby sound in terms of one or more of its phonetic characteristics” (pg. 552)
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This note was uploaded on 12/13/2011 for the course LING 101 taught by Professor Teddemen during the Fall '11 term at University of Alberta.

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Phonetics VII - Phonetics VII October 5, 2011 Today...

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