Chapter_16 - Don Hellriegel Susan E. Jackson John W....

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MANAGING: A COMPETENCY BASED APPROACH 11 th Edition Chapter 16—Communicating Effectively Don Hellriegel John W. Slocum, Jr. Susan E. Jackson
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Chapter 16: PowerPoint 16.2 Communication is the transfer and exchange of information and understanding from one person to another through meaningful symbols Communication can be formal or informal, and may take many forms
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Chapter 16: PowerPoint 16.3 The Communication Process: Snapshot Gibu Thomas, CEO, Sharpcast “People pooh-poohed our idea for more than a year. I took it to mean that either we weren’t explaining it well or we were dead wrong. I realized that we needed to communicate our idea better by connecting the dots more clearly. We did that by finding a metaphor that explained what our company does.”
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Chapter 16: PowerPoint 16.4 (Adapted from Figure 16.1) Receiver provides verbal and nonverbal responses to sender Receiver provides verbal and nonverbal responses to sender Receiver perceives and decodes message Receiver perceives and decodes message Sender’s response to feedback may trigger additional feedback to receiver Sender’s response to feedback may trigger additional feedback to receiver Sender has idea Sender has idea Sender encodes idea into a message Sender encodes idea into a message Message travels over one or more channels Message travels over one or more channels
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Chapter 16: PowerPoint 16.5 Sender (Encoder) Sender: source of information who starts the communication process Encoding: process of translating thoughts or feeling into a medium— written, visual, or spoken—that conveys the meaning intended
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Chapter 16: PowerPoint 16.6 Relevancy Simplicity Organization Focus Repetition
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Chapter 16: PowerPoint 16.7 Receiver: person who receives and decodes (or interprets) the sender’s message Receiver (Decoder) Decoding: translating messages into a form that has meaning to the receiver Key requirement of receiver: the ability to listen
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Chapter 16: PowerPoint 16.8 (Adapted from Table 16.1) Based on your experiences, do you Agree , Disagree , or are you Undecided with each of the following statements: 1. Men are less likely to ask for information or directions in a public situation that would reveal their lack of knowledge 2. In decision making, women are more likely to downplay their certainty; men are more likely to downplay their doubts 3. Women tend to apologize even when they have done nothing wrong; men tend to avoid apologies as signs of weakness or concession 4. Women tend to accept blame as a way of smoothing awkward situations; men tend to ignore blame and place it elsewhere (continued)
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Chapter 16: PowerPoint 16.9 (Adapted from Table 16.1)
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Chapter_16 - Don Hellriegel Susan E. Jackson John W....

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