Einstein remained indifferent to religious conventions and precepts throughout his adult life

Einstein remained indifferent to religious conventions and precepts throughout his adult life

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Einstein remained indifferent to religious conventions and precepts throughout his adult  life. His first wife, Mileva Maric, was a member of the Greek Orthodox Church, and the  marriage took place without the presence of a rabbi or a priest. Although the religious  difference caused both sets of parents to object to the marriage, it did not trouble  Einstein: he did not want his children to receive any form of religious instruction and the  couple practiced no formal religion in their home. Additionally, Einstein asked to be  cremated rather than buried in the Jewish tradition. Thus his disregard for religious  rituals lasted his whole life.  Yet in spite of his disdain for religious instruction in accordance with any particular  denominational tradition, Einstein nonetheless always maintained a pious sentiment of  inspired religious devotion. He identified very closely with the seventeenth-century 
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This note was uploaded on 12/14/2011 for the course BIO 1320 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '09 term at Texas State.

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