For most of World War I

For most of World War I - For most of World War I, Einstein...

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Unformatted text preview: For most of World War I, Einstein remained at the University of Berlin completing, and then awaiting the confirmation of, his general theory of relativity. However, Einstein was also a staunch and outspoken opponent of the war. He was especially appalled by his fellow scientists who supported the war effort of their respective nations, including Otto Stern, Max Born, Walther Nernst, and Marie Curie. In October 1914, two months after the start of the war, Einstein heard news of the publication of the "Manifesto of the 93" (also known as "An Appeal to the Cultured World"), a document created by the German wartime propagandists to persuade the international intellectual community that the German government's invasion of Belgium and involvement in the war were justifiable. The manifesto was signed by ninety-three leading German intellectuals from various...
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For most of World War I - For most of World War I, Einstein...

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