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2556_001 - ARLT 3 and 4 beat lines Our Goodman (A Ballad)...

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Unformatted text preview: ARLT 3 and 4 beat lines Our Goodman (A Ballad) Home came the old man, Home came he; He went into the house, Strange boots did see. “My wife, my beloved wife, 0 what does all this mean? Strange boots here, Where mine ought to been?" "You old fool, you blind fool, Can you not but see, 'Tis nothing but a bootjack, That my mother sent to me?" “Miles have I travelled, Five hundred miles or more, But spurs on a bootjack, I never saw before." Home came the old man, Home came he; He went into the kitchen, A strange hat did see. “My wife, my beloved wife, 0 what does all this mean? A strange hat here, Where my own ought to been?" “You old fool, you blind fool, O can you not but see, ‘Tis nothing but a dinner pot, That mother sent to me?” “Miles have I travelled, Five hundred miles or more, But crape on a dinner pot, I never saw before.” Home came the old man, Home came he; He went into the house, A strange shirt did see. “My wife, my beloved wife, 0 what does all this mean? A strange shirt here, Where my own ought to been?" “You old fool, you blind fool, Can you not but see, ‘Tis nothing but a table cloth, My mother sent to me?" “Miles have I travelled, Five hundred miles or more, But sleeves on a table cloth, I never saw before." Home came the old man, Home came he; He went into the bed room, A strange face did see. “My wife, my beloved wife, 0 what does all this mean? A strange face here, Where mine ought to been?” “You old fool, you blind fool, O can you not but see, ‘Tis nothing but a baby, My mother sent to me?" “Miles have I travelled, Five hundred miles or more, But whiskers on a baby's face, I never saw before." Anonymous Iabberwocky 'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves Did gyre and gimble in the wabe: All mimsy were the borogoves, And the mome raths outgrabe. 'Beware the Iabberwock, my son! The jaws that bite, the claws that catch! Beware the Iubjub bird, and shun The frumious Bandersnatch!‘ He took his vorpal sword in hand: Long time the manxome foe he sought -- So rested he by the Tumtum tree, And stood a while in thought. And, as in uffish thought he stood, The Iabberwock, with eyes of flame, Came whiffling through the tulgey wood, And burbled as it came! One two! One two! And through and through The vorpal blade went snicker-snack! He left it dead, and with its head He went galumphing back. 'And hast thou slain the Iabberwock? Come to my arms, my beamish boy! Oh frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!‘ He chortled in his joy. 'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves Did gyre and gimble in the wabe: All mimsy were the borogoves, And the mome raths outgrabe. Lewis Carroll MY PAPA'S WALTZ The whiskey on your breath Could make a small boy dizzy; But I hung on like death: Such waltzing was not easy. We romped until the pans Slid from the kitchen shelf; My mother's countenance Could not unfrown itself. The hand that held my wrist Was battered on one knuckle; At every step you missed My right ear scraped a buckle. You beat time on my head With a palm caked hard by dirt, Then waltzed me off to bed Still clinging to your shirt. Theodore Roethke anyone lived in a pretty how town e.e. cummings anyone lived in a pretty how town (with up so floating many bells down) spring summer autumn winter he sang his didn't he danced his did Women and men(both little and small) cared for anyone not at all they sowed their isn't they reaped their same sun moon stars rain children guessed(but only a few and down they forgot as up they grew autumn winter spring summer) that noone loved him more by more when by now and tree by leaf she laughed his joy she cried his grief bird by snow and stir by still anyone's any was all to her someones married their everyones laughed their cryings and did their dance (sleep wake hope and then)they said their nevers they slept their dream stars rain sun moon (and only the snow can begin to explain how children are apt to forget to remember with up so floating many bells down) one day anyone died i guess (and noone stooped to kiss his face) busy folk buried them side by side little by little and was by was all by all and deep by deep and more by more they dream their sleep noone and anyone earth by april wish by spirit and if by yes. Women and men(both dong and ding) summer autumn winter spring reaped their sowing and went their came sun moon stars rain The Ballad of Aunt Geneva Geneva was the wild one. Geneva was a tart. Geneva met a blue-eyed boy and gave away her heart. Geneva ran a roadhouse. Geneva wasn’t sent to college like the others: Pomp's pride her punishment. She cooked out on the river, watching the shore slide by, her lips pursed into hardness, her deep-set brown eyes dry. They say she killed a woman over a good black man by braining the jealous heifer with an iron frying pan. They say, when she was eighty, she got up late at night and sneaked her old, white lover in to make love, and to fight. First, they heard the tell-tale singing of the springs, then Geneva’s voice rang out: I need to buy some things, So next time, bring more money. And bring more moxie, too. I ain ’1: got no time to waste on limp white men like you. Oh yeah? Well, Mister White Man, It sure might be stone-white, But my thing’s white as it is. And you know damn well I’m right. Now listen: take your heart pills And pay the doctor mind. If you up and die on me, I’ll whip your white behind. They tiptoed through the parlor on heavy, time-slowed feet. She watched him, from her front door, Walk down the dawnlit street. Geneva was the wild one. Geneva was a tart. Geneva met a blue-eyed boy and gave away her heart. Marilyn Nelson ...
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This note was uploaded on 12/14/2011 for the course -2 190 at USC.

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2556_001 - ARLT 3 and 4 beat lines Our Goodman (A Ballad)...

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