Class6HO - Class 6 Capacitance and Capacitors Physics 106...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–16. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Class 6 Capacitance and Capacitors Physics 106 Fall 2011 Press CTRL-L to view as a slide show. Learning Outcomes From last time: I The field lines are related to the field as follows: I What is the electric potential? I How are the electric field and the electric potential related? I How can we find the electric field and the electric potential? I How are electric fields and electric potentials used in practical applications? I The electric potential is the potential energy divided by the charge I The electric potential is also called the voltage I Applying fields to a CRT Learning Outcomes Today we will discuss: I Capacitance I Capacitors I Capacitors in series and parallel circuits I Dielectrics Capacitance Capacitance I A capacitor consists of two conductors, one with a charge + Q and one with a charge- Q . I Often the conductors are parallel plates. I The voltage difference between the conductors is V . I Out of tradition and laziness, we usually write the voltage difference as just V . Capacitance I C Q V I Units: Farad (F) I 1 F = 1 C / 1 V I A farad is very large I Often will see F or pF Capacitance I Q = CV I A big capacitor holds a large charge at a small voltage . Capacitors Capacitors I First developed by Pieter van Musschenbroek in Leyden in 1746 Parallel-Plate Capacitor I The capacitance of a device depends on the geometric arrangement of the conductors I For a parallel-plate capacitor whose plates are separated by air: C = A d Parallel-Plate Capacitor I The capacitor consists of two parallel plates I Each have area A I They are separated by a distance d I The + charge on one plate holds the- charge on the other plate in place. Parallel-Plate Capacitor I If the plates are large, the capacitor can hold more charge. I If the plates are closer together, the capacitor can hold more charge, because the + charge attracts the- charge more strongly. Parallel Plate Capacitor I Consists of two conducting plates, one positive and one negative I Charge is pulled to the inside surface of either plate I The field outside either plate is zero Parallel Plate Capacitor I Consists of two conducting plates, one positive and one negative I Charge is pulled to the inside surface of either plate I The field outside either plate is zero Electric Field in a Parallel-Plate Capacitor I The electric field between the plates is quite uniform Example 1: Derive the Parallel-Plate Capacitor...
View Full Document

Page1 / 50

Class6HO - Class 6 Capacitance and Capacitors Physics 106...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 16. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online