Class19HO - Class 19 Diffraction, Single Slits,...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–24. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Class 19 Diffraction, Single Slits, Polarization, and the Eye Physics 106 Fall 2011 Press CTRL-L to view as a slide show. Last Time Last time we discussed: I Double Slit Interference I Phase Shifts and Reflection I Thin Film Interference Clicker Question #1 The single slit equation m = a sin is the condition for A. maxima in the diffraction pattern B. mnima in the diffracion C. both maxima and minima in the diffraction pattern Clicker Question #2 The near point is A. the nearest focal point for a nearsighted eye B. the smallest object distance for which a nearsighted eye can focus C. the nearest focal point for a farsighted eye D. the smallest object distance for which a farsighted eye can focus Learning Outcomes Today we will discuss: I The Eye I Single Slit Diffraction I Polarization I Thin Film Examples The Eye The Eye I The normal eye forms an image on the retina I The cornea does most of the focusing I The pupil is a variable aperture Parts of the Eye I The cornea-lens system focuses light onto the retina I The retina contains receptors called rods and cones I These structures send impulses via the optic nerve to the brain I The brain maps these signals into a representation of the world Parts of the Eye I The iris is the colored portion of the eye I It is a muscular diaphragm that controls pupil size Lens Diameter and Depth of Field I The iris is used to change the effective size of the lens. Lens Diameter and Depth of Field Lens Diameter and Depth of Field Lens Diameter and Depth of Field Lens Diameter and Depth of Field Lens Diameter and Depth of Field Lens Diameter and Depth of Field Lens Diameter and Depth of Field Lens Diameter and Depth of Field Lens Diameter and Depth of Field Operation of the Eye I Rods and Cones I Chemically adjust their sensitivity according to the prevailing light conditions I The adjustment takes about 15 minutes I This phenomena is "getting used to the dark" I Accommodation I The eye focuses on an object by varying the shape of the crystalline lens through this process I An important component is the ciliary musclewhich is situated in a circle around the rim of the lens I Thin filaments, called zonules, run from this muscle to the edge of the lens The Eye - Focusing I The eye can focus on a distant object I The ciliary muscle is relaxed I The zonules tighten I This causes the lens to flatten, increasing its focal length I For an object at infinity, the focal length of the eye is equal to the fixed distance between lens and retina, about 1.7 cm The Eye - Focusing I The eye can focus on near objects I The ciliary muscles tenses I This relaxes the zonules I The lens bulges a bit and the focal length decreases I The image is focused on the retina The Eye - Near and Far Points I The near point is the closest distance for which the lens can accommodate to focus light on the retina I Typically at age 10, this is about 18 cm I It increases with age I The far point represents the largest distance for which the lens of the relaxed eye can focus light on the retina I Normal vision has a far point of infinity Conditions of the Eye...
View Full Document

Page1 / 115

Class19HO - Class 19 Diffraction, Single Slits,...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 24. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online