Class26HO - Class 26 Fundamental Forces General Relativity Antimatter Physics 106 Fall 2011 Press CTRL-L to view as a slide show Rate the Tutors If

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Class 26 Fundamental Forces, General Relativity, Antimatter Physics 106 Fall 2011 Press CTRL-L to view as a slide show.
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Rate the Tutors If you used the physics tutorial lab this semester, we invite you to rate the tutors who helped you. Rating form and photos of tutors: gardner.byu.edu/tas/tutorrating.html
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Last Time Last time we discussed: I The Beginnings of Nuclear Physics I Nuclear Size and Shape I Radioactive Decay Processes I Half-lives I Nuclear Energy
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Learning Outcomes Today we will discuss: I Elementary Particles I Fundamental Interactions I Feynman Diagrams I New Particles
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Elementary Particles
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Elementary Particles I Atoms I From the Greek for "indivisible" I Were once thought to the elementary particles I Atomic constituents I Proton, neutron, and electron I Were viewed as elementary because they are very stable (almost)
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Discovery of New Particles I New particles I Beginning in 1937, many new particles were discovered in experiments involving high-energy collisions I Characteristically unstable with short lifetimes I Over 300 have been cataloged I A pattern was needed to understand all these new particles
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Quarks I Physicists believe that most particles are made up of quarks I Exceptions include photons and electrons I The quark model has reduced the array of particles to a manageable few I The quark model has successfully predicted new quark combinations that were subsequently found in many experiments
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Fundamental Interactions
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Fundamental Forces All particles in nature are subject to four fundamental forces I Strong force I Electromagnetic force I Weak force I Gravitational force
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Class26HO - Class 26 Fundamental Forces General Relativity Antimatter Physics 106 Fall 2011 Press CTRL-L to view as a slide show Rate the Tutors If

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