Smain_106HO

Smain_106HO - Classical Orbits, Bohr-Sommerfeld Orbits, and...

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Classical Orbits, Bohr-Sommerfeld Orbits, and Schrödinger Orbitals L. B. Rees Brigham Young University November 10, 2011
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The Hydrogen Atom I We will work with the simplest of atoms, the hydrogen atom.
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The Hydrogen Atom I We will work with the simplest of atoms, the hydrogen atom. I The total energy of an orbit is the sum of kinetic and potential energies.
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The Hydrogen Atom I We will work with the simplest of atoms, the hydrogen atom. I The total energy of an orbit is the sum of kinetic and potential energies. I The potential energy is just the electrostatic potential energy: U = - k e e 2 r
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The Hydrogen Atom I The potential energy is negative and the kinetic energy is positive.
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The Hydrogen Atom I The potential energy is negative and the kinetic energy is positive. I For a bound electron, the potential energy is larger than the kinetic energy, so the total energy is negative.
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The Hydrogen Atom I The potential energy is negative and the kinetic energy is positive. I For a bound electron, the potential energy is larger than the kinetic energy, so the total energy is negative. I We can measure energy level differences in atoms using spectroscopy.
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The Ground State I There is a lowest energy for an electron in a hydrogen atom. This is called the "ground state."
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The Ground State I There is a lowest energy for an electron in a hydrogen atom. This is called the "ground state." I An electron is normally in the ground state.
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The Ground State I There is a lowest energy for an electron in a hydrogen atom. This is called the "ground state." I An electron is normally in the ground state. I If energy is added to an electron, it can move to an orbit of higher energy.
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The Ground State I There is a lowest energy for an electron in a hydrogen atom. This is called the "ground state." I An electron is normally in the ground state. I If energy is added to an electron, it can move to an orbit of higher energy. I After a short time, the electron falls back to the ground state, with its energy being emitted as a photon.
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The Ground State I There is a lowest energy for an electron in a hydrogen atom. This is called the "ground state." I An electron is normally in the ground state. I If energy is added to an electron, it can move to an orbit of higher energy. I After a short time, the electron falls back to the ground state, with its energy being emitted as a photon. I The ground state energy of a hydrogen atom is E 1 = - 13 . 6 eV.
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I There is a lowest energy for an electron in a hydrogen atom. This is called the "ground state." I An electron is normally in the ground state. I If energy is added to an electron, it can move to an orbit of higher energy. I After a short time, the electron falls back to the ground state, with its energy being emitted as a photon. I
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This document was uploaded on 12/15/2011.

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Smain_106HO - Classical Orbits, Bohr-Sommerfeld Orbits, and...

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