Exam 1 Study Guide

Exam 1 Study Guide - BMGT498B Exam 1 Study Guide 1...

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BMGT498B Exam 1 Study Guide 1) Principle of proximity Elements close together are perceived as a single group or chunk and are interpreted as being more related than elements that are further apart One of several principles referred to as Gestalt principles of perception One of the most powerful means of indicating relatedness in a design, and will generally overwhelm competing visual cues Be sure that labels and supporting information are near the elements that they describe o EX: window controls in the car—near the window 2) Gestalt Recognize whole even if part is missing 3) Principle of similarity Elements that are similar are perceived to be more related than elements that are dissimilar Also referred to as a Gestalt principle of perception o of multiple, disparate chunks, and reinforces differences among the elements Certain kinds of similarity work better than others for different situations o Similarity of color results in the strongest grouping effect. It is strongest when the number of colors is small and is decreasingly effective as the number of colors increases. o Similarity of size is effective when the size of elements are clearly distinguishable from one another and is an especially appropriate grouping strategy when the size of elements has additional benefits o Similarity of shape is the weakest grouping strategy and is best used when the color and size of other elements is uniform or when used in conjunction with size and color Use similarity to indicate relatedness among elements in a design Use the fewest colors and simplest shapes possible for the strongest grouping effects Combine color grouping with size or shape since many people are color blind 4) Grouping Grouping resulting from proximity/similarity reduces the complexity of designs and reinforces the relatedness of the elements Conversely, a lack of similarity/proximity results in the perception of multiple, disparate chunks, and reinforces differences among the elements 5) Aesthetic-usability effect We perceive more-aesthetic designs easier to use than less-aesthetic designs--whether they are or not
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Aesthetically-pleasing designs look easier to use and have a high probability of being used, whether or not they actually are easier to use Aesthetically pleasing designs are more effective at fostering positive attitudes than unaesthetic designs and make people more tolerant of design problems o EX: a dress that you love the design but you deal with snugness, falling straps, etc Such personal and positive relationships with a design evoke feelings of affection, loyalty, and patience— all significant factors in the long-term usability and overall success of a design Positive relationships with a design result in an interaction that helps catalyze creative thinking and problem solving; Negative relationships result in an interaction that narrows thinking and stifles creativity o Especially true in stressful environments, since stress increases fatigue and reduces cognitive
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Exam 1 Study Guide - BMGT498B Exam 1 Study Guide 1...

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