Lecture7ZooplanktonI

Lecture7ZooplanktonI - SOURCE: US DOE Office of Science...

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SOURCE: US DOE – Office of Science
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Zooplankton I Nutrients, temperature and light availability may limit phytoplankton growth rate but…. GRAZING often sets the upper limit of accumulation of phytoplankton biomass (“top down control”) (Phytoplankton blooms can only occur if phytoplankton growth rate exceeds grazing rate)
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Sizes of Zooplankton Micro zooplankton: 20-200 μ m Meso zooplankton: ~200 to 2000 μ m Macro plankton (big!) (~ larger than a cm)
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Plagiopyla frontata , a marine ciliated protozoan Strombidium oculatum Strombidium Oligotrich ciliates Examples of microzooplankton: ciliates
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More microzooplankton examples: Pteropods, Foraminifera, Radiolarians Foraminifera are a group of amoeboid protists that produce an elaborate shell often made of calcium carbonate. Incorporating their surrounding elements into their shells, foraminifera deposited in sediments are extremely useful in paleoceanography, and are used to reconstruct the ocean conditions and climate of the past.
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(Thecosamata; left images), a suborder of pelagic sea-snails, are composed of aragonite, an easily dissolvable form of calcium carbonate. Also known as “sea butterflies”. Some pteropods are “naked” (no shell). Some may be large enough to be classified as “mesozooplankton”. The intricate shells of radiolaria (right, below) are composed of silicate.
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This note was uploaded on 12/14/2011 for the course BIOL 450 taught by Professor Ms.richardson during the Fall '10 term at South Carolina.

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Lecture7ZooplanktonI - SOURCE: US DOE Office of Science...

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